Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Anti-aging Airdrie

New article on anti-aging:

 

Dermatologists' Tips to Reduce the Signs of Aging

ScienceDaily (Aug. 14, 2012) — Getting better results from your anti-aging products can be as easy as following simple tips from dermatologists.


"People often think that the more expensive a product is, the more effective it will be," said board-certified dermatologist Susan C. Taylor, MD, FAAD, founding director of the Skin of Color Center at St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals in New York City. "That's not always the case. People need to shop smart since there are some very effective, affordable products in the skin care aisles of their local stores."
To get the most from age-fighting products, Dr. Taylor recommends people also follow these tips:
1. Wear sunscreen every day since the sun's rays can accelerate signs of aging. Use a sunscreen or facial moisturizer that offers broad-spectrum protection and has an SPF of at least 30. Be sure to apply sunscreen to all skin that is not covered by clothing.
2. Do not tan. Getting a tan from the sun or a tanning bed exposes you to harmful UV rays that can accelerate aging, causing wrinkles, age spots, a blotchy complexion and even skin cancer.
3. Moisturize. Moisturizing traps water in the skin, which can help reduce the appearance of some fine lines and make your complexion look brighter and younger.
4. Test products, even those labeled "hypoallergenic." To test, dab a small amount of the product on your inner forearm twice a day for four to five days. If you do not have a reaction, it is likely safe for you to apply to your face.
5. Use the product as directed. Active ingredients can do more harm than good when too much is used. Applying more than directed can cause clogged pores, a blotchy complexion, or other unwanted effects.
6. Stop using products that sting or burn unless prescribed by a dermatologist. Irritating the skin makes signs of aging more noticeable.
o Some products prescribed by a dermatologist may cause stinging or burning. When under a dermatologist's care, this can be safe and effective.
7. Limit the number of products. Using too many products on your skin, especially more than one anti-aging product, tends to irritate the skin. This often makes signs of aging more noticeable.
"It's very important that people allow time for the product to work. While a moisturizer can immediately plump up fine lines, most products take at least six weeks to work and sometimes it can take three months," said Dr. Taylor. "See a dermatologist if after following these tips you still do not see the expected results," said Dr. Taylor.



To book an appointment call 587-360-1100
He is your Airdrie Naturopath and serving the surrounding, Olds, Didsbury, Drumheller, Calgary area.
 
 
Dr. Kin Leung, B.Sc., N.D., CCT, CPCC
Naturopathic Fundamentals Wellness Clinic
191 Edwards Way SW, Unit 103
Airdrie, AB
T4E 3E2
Canada
(587) 360-1100
 
 

Friday, August 10, 2012

Check me out in the local paper: New provincial regulations applauded by local naturopath


http://www.airdriecityview.com/article/20120801/ACV0801/308019962/-1/ACV/new-provincial-regulations-applauded-by-local-naturopath

New provincial regulations applauded by local naturopath

Aug 01, 2012 07:23 pm | By Dawn Smith | Airdrie City View
Airdrie’s newest naturopath is happy with a new provincial regulation that establishes the College of Naturopathic Doctors of Alberta and gives the body the authority to self-govern.
“It basically means that we will have more access to (medical files),” said Dr. Kin Leung, who is in the process of opening a new naturopathic clinic located in northwest Airdrie.
“Right now we can’t access files like normal medical doctors.”
The change also gives the college the authority to establish requirements for entry into the profession and ongoing professional development.
Leung said the change is positive. The regulation will also allow the College to set standards for professional practice, investigate complaints and govern use of protected titles, including Naturopath and Naturopathic Doctor.
“There are a lot of people that call themselves naturopaths,” he said. “Now that it is regulated, people can’t claim to be naturopaths. It protects the public as well.”
According to Leung, who has been practicing for five years and is opening a new clinic on Aug. 1 that will specialize in cancer treatment, the new regulation also brings credibility to the profession.
Becoming a naturopath requires four years of medical training just like someone who practices traditional western medicine, he added.
The Province made the announcement to changes under the Health Professions Act on July 25.
“Our government recognizes that Albertans want choice when it comes to their health, especially in the areas of wellness and illness prevention,” said Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne.
“More and more people are relying on the services of naturopathic doctors, and they can now be assured that the practitioner they visit has the competency and skills required to practice in Alberta.”
“Today, Albertans can have confidence when they reach out to a member of the College of Naturopathic Doctors of Alberta, that they have a naturopathic doctor who meets stringent competency and practice requirements,” said Dr. Allissa Gaul, founding president of the College of Naturopathic Doctors of Alberta.
“We offer Albertans a distinct system of primary health care that is an art, a science, a philosophy and a practice of diagnosis and assessment, treatment and prevention of illness, and we applaud this government for making health and wellness a priority to benefit Albertans.”
Naturopathic doctors focus on health promotion, illness prevention and treating disease using natural therapies.
In addition to authorizing self-governance, the regulation also describes the restricted activities naturopathic doctors registered with the college are permitted to perform, including injections, minor surgeries, obtaining skin samples for biopsies and doing sutures, ear examinations, cerumen management, nasal lavage and placing herbs in nasal passages.
With additional training approved by the college, naturopathic doctors are also able to perform alternative medical treatments such as acupuncture, chiropractic treatments, intravenous administration of ozone, chelation therapy or supplemental vitamins and minerals.
Naturopathic doctors are not permitted to prescribe drugs, order X-rays or ultrasounds or administer intravenous nutrition. There are 144 practicing naturopathic doctors in Alberta.
Minimum educational requirements are three years of pre-medical education plus completion of a four-year professional program at an approved, accredited naturopathic college or university.
Naturopathic services are not covered by the Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan.
Professional regulation also facilitates registration of naturopathic doctors, allowing Albertans to claim naturopathy costs as a medical expense on their personal income tax returns.





To book an appointment call 587-360-1100
He is your Airdrie Naturopath and serving the surrounding, Olds, Didsbury, Drumheller, Calgary area.
Dr. Kin Leung, B.Sc., N.D., CCT, CPCC
Naturopathic Fundamentals Wellness Clinic
191 Edwards Way SW, Unit 103
Airdrie, AB
T4E 3E2
Canada
(587) 360-1100
www.naturopathicfundamentals.com
http://chelationtherapyreddeer.blogspot.com/
www.youtube.com/user/drkinleung

Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Improve your Cardiovascular disease

New Article:

One-Year Consumption of a Grape Nutraceutical Containing Resveratrol Improves the Inflammatory and Fibrinolytic Status of Patients in Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

João Tomé-Carneiro, Manuel Gonzálvez, Mar Larrosa, et al. Am J Cardiol. 2012 Apr 19. [Epub ahead of print]

The search for complementary treatments in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a high-priority challenge. Grape and wine polyphenol resveratrol confers CV benefits, in part by exerting anti-inflammatory effects. However, the evidence in human long-term clinical trials has yet to be established. We aimed to investigate the effects of a dietary resveratrol-rich grape supplement on the inflammatory and fibrinolytic status of subjects at high risk of CVD and treated according to current guidelines for primary prevention of CVD. Seventy-five patients undergoing primary prevention of CVD participated in this triple-blinded, randomized, parallel, dose–response, placebo-controlled, 1-year follow-up trial. Patients, allocated in 3 groups, consumed placebo (maltodextrin), a resveratrol-rich grape supplement (resveratrol 8 mg), or a conventional grape supplement lacking resveratrol, for the first 6 months and a double dose for the next 6 months. In contrast to placebo and conventional grape supplement, the resveratrol-rich grape supplement significantly decreased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (−26%, p = 0.03), tumor necrosis factor-α (−19.8%, p = 0.01), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (−16.8%, p = 0.03), and interleukin-6/interleukin-10 ratio (−24%, p = 0.04) and increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (19.8%, p = 0.00). Adiponectin (6.5%, p = 0.07) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (−5.7%, p = 0.06) tended to increase and decrease, respectively. No adverse effects were observed in any patient. In conclusion, 1-year consumption of a resveratrol-rich grape supplement improved the inflammatory and fibrinolytic status in patients who were on statins for primary prevention of CVD and at high CVD risk (i.e., with diabetes or hypercholesterolemia plus ≥1 other CV risk factor). Our results show for the first time that a dietary intervention with grape resveratrol could complement the gold standard therapy in the primary prevention of CVD.
PMID: 22520621

To book an appointment call 587-360-1100
He is your Airdrie Naturopath and serving the surrounding, Olds, Didsbury, Drumheller, Calgary area.
 
Dr. Kin Leung, B.Sc., N.D., CCT, CPCC
Naturopathic Fundamentals Wellness Clinic
191 Edwards Way SW, Unit 103
Airdrie, AB
T4E 3E2
Canada
(587) 360-1100
 
 
www.naturopathicfundamentals.com
http://chelationtherapyreddeer.blogspot.com/
www.youtube.com/user/drkinleung

Friday, August 3, 2012

Want Better Grades? Stay Healthy!

New Article:

 

Students With Strong Hearts and Lungs May Make Better Grades

ScienceDaily (Aug. 3, 2012) — Having a healthy heart and lungs may be one of the most important factors for middle school students to make good grades in math and reading, according to findings presented at the American Psychological Association's 120th Annual Convention.

"Cardiorespiratory fitness was the only factor that we consistently found to have an impact on both boys' and girls' grades on reading and math tests," said study co-author Trent A. Petrie, PhD, professor of psychology and director of the Center for Sport Psychology at the University of North Texas. "This provides more evidence that schools need to re-examine any policies that have limited students' involvement in physical education classes."
The researchers gathered data at five Texas middle schools from 1,211 students, of whom 54 percent were female with an average age of about 12. Overall, the group was 57 percent white. Among the boys, the breakdown was 57.2 percent white, 24.2 percent Mexican-American, 9.1 percent African American, 1.1 percent Asian-American and 1.2 percent American Indian. For the girls, 58.6 percent were white, 23.4 percent were Mexican-American, 9.2 percent were African-American, 2.3 percent Asian-American and 0.6 percent were American Indian.
While previous studies have found links between being physically fit and improved academic performance, this study also examined several other potential influences, including self-esteem and social support. It also took into account the students' socioeconomic status and their self-reported academic ability, Petrie said.
In addition to cardiorespiratory fitness, social support was related to better reading scores among boys, according to the study. It defined social support as reliable help from family and friends to solve problems or deal with emotions. For girls, having a larger body mass index was the only factor other than cardiorespiratory fitness that predicted better reading scores. For boys and girls, cardiorespiratory fitness was the only factor related to their performance on the math tests. "The finding that a larger body mass index for girls was related to better performance on the reading exam may seem counterintuitive, however past studies have found being overweight was not as important for understanding boys and girls performances on tests as was their level of physical fitness," Petrie said.
From one to five months before the students were to take annual standardized reading and math tests, they answered questions about their level of physical activity, and how they viewed their academic ability, self-esteem and social support. The school district provided information on the students' socioeconomic status and reading and math scores at the end of the year.
To determine students' physical fitness, the researchers worked with physical education teachers to administer a fitness assessment program widely used in U.S. schools. The program includes a variety of tests to assess aerobic capacity, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. The assessment provides an objective measure of cardiorespiratory fitness through the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run, or PACER, and body composition through measuring BMI, the study said.
"Because this is a longitudinal study, these variables can now be considered risk factors in relation to middle school students' performance on math and reading examinations," Petrie said. "And that is essential to developing effective programs to support academic success."
Presentation: "Physical Fitness and Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Investigation," Sudhish Srikanth, lead author, Trent A. Petrie, PhD, Christy Greenleaf, PhD, and Scott Martin, PhD, University of North Texas; Session 2120, Friday, Aug. 3, 10 -- 10:50 a.m. Convention Center, Room W310A, Level III.


To book an appointment call 587-360-1100
He is your Airdrie Naturopath and serving the surrounding, Olds, Didsbury, Drumheller, Calgary area.
 
Dr. Kin Leung, B.Sc., N.D., CCT, CPCC
Naturopathic Fundamentals Wellness Clinic
191 Edwards Way SW, Unit 103
Airdrie, AB
T4E 3E2
Canada
(587) 360-1100
 

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Allergies? Your Sneeze Is a Biological Response to the Nose's 'Blue Screen of Death'


New interesting article:

ScienceDaily (July 31, 2012) — New research suggests that sneezing is the body's natural reboot and that patients with disorders of the nose such as sinusitis can't reboot, explaining why they sneeze more often than others.

Who would have thought that our noses and Microsoft Windows' infamous blue screen of death could have something in common? But that's the case being made by a new research report appearing online in The FASEB Journal. Specifically, scientists now know exactly why we sneeze, what sneezing should accomplish, and what happens when sneezing does not work properly. Much like a temperamental computer, our noses require a "reboot" when overwhelmed, and this biological reboot is triggered by the pressure force of a sneeze. When a sneeze works properly, it resets the environment within nasal passages so "bad" particles breathed in through the nose can be trapped. The sneeze is accomplished by biochemical signals that regulate the beating of cilia (microscopic hairs) on the cells that line our nasal cavities.
"While sinusitis rarely leads to death, it has a tremendous impact on quality of life, with the majority of symptoms coming from poor clearance of mucus," said Noam A. Cohen, M.D., Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. "By understanding the process by which patients with sinusitis do not clear mucus from their nose and sinuses, we can try to develop new strategies to compensate for their poor mucus clearance and improve their quality of life."
To make this discovery, Cohen and colleagues used cells from the noses of mice which were grown in incubators and measured how these cells cleared mucus. They examined how the cells responded to a simulated sneeze (puff of air) by analyzing the cells' biochemical responses. Some of the experiments were replicated in human sinus and nasal tissue removed from patients with and without sinusitis. They found that cells from patients with sinusitis do not respond to sneezes in the same manner as cells obtained from patients who do not have sinusitis. The researchers speculate that sinusitis patients sneeze more frequently because their sneezes fail to reset the nasal environment properly or are less efficient at doing so. Further understanding of why sinusitis patients have this difficulty could aid in the development of more effective medications or treatments.
"I'm confident that modern biochemical studies of ciliary beating frequency will help us find new treatments for chronic sinusitis," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, "I'm far less confident in our abilities to resolve messy computer crashes. We now know why we sneeze. Computer crashes are likely to be a mystery forever."

 Your Airdrie Naturopath
Dr. Kin Leung, B.Sc., N.D., CCT, CPCC
Naturopathic Fundamentals Wellness Clinic
191 Edwards Way SW, Unit 103
Airdrie, AB
T4E 3E2
Canada
(587) 360-1100
 www.naturopathicfundamentals.com
                                                               drkinleung@gmail.com